Professional Development or On Your Own?

Just curious whether you’re taking this MOOC on your own time, or if your library is supporting it as professional development, and allowing you to experience the magic during work time.

55 thoughts on “Professional Development or On Your Own?

  1. Avatar of Cath SheardCath Sheard

    Very much in my own time. We tend to do generic ‘customer skills’ stuff in work time and are left to upskill ourselves on the library side. Something I argue against all the time, for myself and my staff.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Cath,
      Thanks for the feedback! I think because MOOCs are so new, they haven’t quite figured out how to handle them yet, in terms of time allowed. It seems that job relevant webinars are ok, and fairly inexpensive, local conferences are a go, but I think the MOOC is still seen as an elective. Maybe I was a little too enthusiastic about it when I got in lol, and now they think it’s all fun and games. If they only knew how much we’re learning :-) Keep up the good fight for yourself and your staff!

      Reply
  2. Avatar of KSKS

    Officially, I’ve been given permission to do this on library time. In reality, it will be a mix because there is no way I could keep up with my work and do this all in my weekly library hours. So I’ll watch the videos, do my blogging, and skim some other blogs and tribe posts on library time, but probably do most of my reading on my own time. (I’ve already requested one of the titles suggested in the first video through my library system and found a second on our own shelves !)

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Kate! Thanks for taking the time to comment :-) I like the idea of a mix, and yours sounds like a perfect balance. I agree that it all couldn’t possibly be done at work, I’d never be able to concentrate on the readings. I’m hoping to get similar permissions. There are two of us here that are going through the MOOC, and we thought we’d wait to see what kind of a workload Module 1 presented before we ask for some time. Keeping fingers crossed!

      Reply
  3. Avatar of Lisa PritchardLisa Pritchard

    I’m doing the MOOC as a mixture of both. My role is lifelong librarian, and its a very loose job description so the MOOC fits into that perfectly! Now we have begun, I suppose I should officially ask for time in case others wonder what I am doing….

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Lisa! Thanks for offering your input. Don’t worry, I haven’t officially asked either lol I love your role as lifelong librarian. I think we should all loosen up our job descriptions a bit, to make way for a whole new way of learning. I’m so pleased with the people I’ve met in the last few days, and I hear others saying the same thing. All of these great conversations about libraries have certainly sparked my professional development :-)

      Reply
  4. Avatar of Scott GilbertScott Gilbert

    I’m doing the MOOC both to learn about the MOOC environment (for my students who will also be entering MOOCS and adding them to their academic careers in addition to what they’re getting from my school) and also as prof. development. Some I will do on company time, and some on my own, and that’s okay with either party. I have a weird position (virtual librarian for distance learning students who are students at institutions other than the one which employs me), so I have to make my own opportunities for prof. development.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Scott! Thanks so much for your comment. It’s nice to hear that it’s perfectly acceptable for you to work on the MOOC for a portion of your work day. I’m happy you mentioned the fact that one of the reasons you’re here, is to check out the MOOC environment for your students. Our university just rolled out a series of MOOCS for some of the harder to get into GE classes. Wouldn’t it benefit us all if we knew ahead of time what they were going to experience? I think it’s great that you’re out there going through it first, so you can provide them with the best guidance as they move forward. You’ll have to write a blog post about your position, sounds really interesting!

      Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Wendy! Thanks for chiming in! I can’t stop learning either. People are looking at me funny when I tell them I just got my master’s, and now I’m signing up for a 12 week voluntary course lol And, I’m excited about it! Love your avatar name by the way, clever!

      Reply
  5. Avatar of Michael StephensMichael Stephens

    This thread is super cool! I wrote about seeking challenges and always learning at LJ:

    “I have a little plaque in my office I purchased in England, quoting Michelangelo: “I am still learning.” I tell my students that the minute I stop learning, I need to pack up my office and go sell tomatoes on the highway somewhere.”

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Thanks, Michael! I’m quite honored that you stopped by :-) I love the plaque that you bought. It’s so true. I decided to go back to school after a trip to Ireland, when I was 40! In fact, my daughter and I were both attending classes at SJSU at the same time. It was great! I will be old and gray and still doing MOOCS. Thanks so much for giving us the opportunity to do this.

      Reply
  6. Avatar of Marika PinedaMarika Pineda

    I really value professional development in my library, and I would be thrilled if any of my staff did a project like this MOOC while at work. Accordingly, I gave myself permission to do this professional development piece while at work. However, there’s not enough time in the day to get all my work done, so I’m splitting out what I do at the office and what I do at home. Another reason I like MOOCing in the office is that it’s easier to plug new ideas or notes into my work plan for the day or quarter. The readings are helping to stimulate my thinking about our upcoming library in-service.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Marika,
      You don’t know how happy I am to hear you say that! That’s very cool that you support your staff this way. I was just reading Michael’s White Paper tonight, and I loved it when he said, “an organization focused on experimentation and play encourages all staff to learn.” There definitely is a buzz in the air in my department between the staff involved in the MOOC, we’re sharing ideas and talking about our readings. I don’t see how it could possibly be a bad thing. And you’re right, it IS easier to apply our new ideas right into our work when it’s fresh in our minds. Really good idea about the in-service! Thanks for your comment!

      Reply
  7. Avatar of heatherlheatherl

    This is so interesting! I’m here off my own bat (but my boss knows and is supportive so maybe some work time as well). The interesting thing is over in my ‘for credit’ PG Dip course I’m researching MOOCs as professional development (as distinct from MOOCs as a pipeline to accredited study). This thread makes it seem like all the stars are aligning :-)
    I agree Marika that even if my workplace is supportive, I still have to fit everything into the same work day so in reality a lot will get done outside of office hours.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Heather!
      Oh, I’d love to read your research when you’re done! You should be able to collect all kinds of evidence in this class! I’m becoming quite fascinated with the whole thing :-) I’m glad you’re finding this thread helpful, and so glad you dropped in. I’m here mostly on my own doing, because I didn’t get a chance to take Michael’s class in library school(ran out of semesters), and I really wanted to. It was my worst regret, but here we are now, and what a productive twelve weeks this will be! I’m only now seeing how much I will gain professionally from taking part in this MOOC. Really glad to hear your boss supports your efforts. Sounds like the odd video or blog post on work time won’t be a problem.

      Reply
  8. Avatar of Bradley S.Bradley S.

    I am definitely doing this on my own time. My employer may be willing to give me time, but even then I would not have time at work to do this. Being the only librarian at my work.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi, Bradley!
      Thank you so much for bringing another angle to the party! It’s something we should definitely consider, smaller libraries simply may not have the luxury of entertaining MOOCs on company time. That may be a whole research topic in itself. I’m happy that you see your employer as willing, and totally understand the being busy part. I think that sometimes, just knowing that it would be ok, is almost as good as it being ok (if that makes sense). I commend you on your quest for professional development amidst scheduling challenges. For me, I’ll do this with or without work time (hearing a U2 song in my head) but am still pulling for an understanding management ear, and the ok to watch a lecture or two at work :-)

      Reply
  9. Avatar of Megan IngleMegan Ingle

    Am doing this outside of work – have just started a new job & there’s so much to learn just in that #newjob space, that I know I wouldn’t have time to do any of this at work.

    That said, there’s a couple of other people from my physical workplace (@hmlamond, @libr4rygirl) doing this MOOC so perhaps at least the conversations about THL will happen organically.

    Part of me wants to do this in my own time for now, as the pressure to “give back” to the workplace might make me put some weird self-induced pressure on myself. But I am hoping to be able to bring my experience of MOOCs into discussions at my workplace. We’ll see how & whether or not that will happen.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Megan!
      I can totally appreciate the dynamics and challenges of a new job, (congrats, by the way!), and how it might be somewhat difficult to fit a MOOC in while you’re learning the ropes. I’m so glad that you have two other colleagues taking the course along with you. Those conversations will be valuable. Try to forget about the self-induced pressure for now, and just have a good time, and enjoy what you’re learning. I think that the colleagues that aren’t familiar with the MOOC will find your insights impressive. Best of luck to you, and thanks for your comment!

      Reply
  10. Avatar of HenryHenry

    I’m not yet working in a library (I’m a library student at another university) but I’ve found over time that you have to take charge of your own career development, and to do that you often aren’t going to have permission to do this sort of thing during the work day. It is awesome to see that some folks have enlightened employers who see the benefit to allowing this during work hours.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Henry!
      Thanks for stopping by! I completely agree with you, we really do have to take charge of our own professional development! The funding at my library set aside for the cause is almost non-existent. If we get a grant, or otherwise win an award, the cost difference and time will be covered, but if not, the event is pretty much left up to us to deal with on our own time. With MOOCs on the rise, I can’t see a reason that an employer would oppose free career development. But its early days yet, and we sort of have to set the precedence. I, too, am very pleased to see so many employers jumping on board. So, hopefully, you can look forward to some work time set aside for MOOCs on your first library job!

      Reply
  11. Pingback: Module 1 Wrap-Up | The Hyperlinked Library

  12. mdelhaye

    I’ll be the “grumpy cat” on this one : nobody knows at work I’m on a MOOC, since, I’m afraid, nobody knows what a mooc is in my library…
    So I do it mostly on my spare time, but as the readings for the courses are also a way to keep up, they happen on my working time as well.
    The borders are getting more and more blurry between professional and personnal activities on social networks, and it’s some times difficult to separate the time devoted to each activities.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Marlene,
      Well, I happen to adore Grumpy Cat, and I truly appreciate your honesty on this one =^,^=
      You bring up a really good point, in that there are still a lot of people who don’t know a lot about MOOCs. It’s very early days yet, and even some SLIS students haven’t heard of them, unless it’s been mentioned in a class. I think employers are a bit afraid of them at this point, and like you said, can’t really distinguish if they’re professional, or personal development. What may look like we’re having a good chat and checking out someone’s profile, may actually be us obtaining some very valuable library information.
      We all know what Grumpy Cat would say about MOOCs :-( lol but we know she loves them anyway.

      Reply
  13. Avatar of Karen PellegrinoKaren Pellegrino

    I’m doing this MOOC on my own time. I work part-time in an academic library so it would be too hard to fit this into my regular working hours. I also work casual hours in a public library, and have just started a teaching role twice a week. I’m juggling different roles with the course! :-)

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Karen!
      Thanks so much for your input here. I can see with your varied schedule, how it would be pretty hard to fit in work on the MOOC during your scheduled hours. I’m interested to learn more about your teaching role. Are you teaching an information literacy class? I’d be curious to see how many information literacy instructors have begun introducing MOOCS, just to let the students know they’re out there. By the way, I’ve always admired jugglers! :-)

      Reply
  14. Avatar of Evan CarlsonEvan Carlson

    What an interesting thread! Many thoughtful comments here, and kind of fascinating to hear about folks’ various postions and library situations into the mix! As for myself, I am very much doing this on my own time (it is 4:43am), although I *may* have peeked in once or twice at work! I was stoked when this MOOC was announced, and have been waiting for it in anticipation for months. And while it feels a bit bursting at the seams at moments to balance everything between library work and home responsibilities and our MOOC, I would not miss this for the world. Can’t quite describe it, but I feel 100% alive in a way when I am part of something like this, intensely engaged and inhabiting something wonderful in shared purpose with amazing people from around the world, getting inspired, learning, sharing, it is kind of a tremendous mental spa, intellectually and emotionally cleansing, refreshing, and revitalized. And while it has at times felt a tad overwhelming, I really appreciated reading @michael‘s Module 1 Wrap-Up this morning, (http://mooc.hyperlib.sjsu.edu/blog/module-1-wrap-up/) where he writes that it’s okay to feel a bit overwhelmed or a bit behind – made me feel better to read that! And that’s also where I learned of this awesome thread. And Diane I really love that you took to the time to write such meaningful replies to everyone’s comments, really enhances what is already such an interesting conversation here. Very cool! :)

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Evan!
      First of all, I must say thank you for the sincere compliment at the end of your post! I really do appreciate it :-) I feel very fortunate that all of you have taken the time to leave your input and ideas, and those posts deserve nothing less than a personal acknowledgment. I’ve learned so much already, and we still have eleven weeks to go! We are all going to be SO brilliant! Lol
      Your enthusiasm for being here is catching. You seriously have to claim your phrase, “mental spa”! It’s perfect for this experience, and I commend you for your 4:43 am appearance!
      Diane

      Reply
  15. Beth Dalton

    I will be doing this on my own time. I am also taking a UNIX/LINUX class and a C# class. There is always something new to learn! I appreciate the opportunity. It is clear that a great deal of thought and effort has gone into the MOOC. It is a gift to the library community.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Beth!
      What a great way to phrase it! A gift! It certainly is!! :-) Sounds like you’ve got a full plate this semester. You’re going to have an advantage in the library with those classes. I have one colleague, in technical services, that knows how to do all of that, and other libraries are always trying to steal her lol Much luck with the classes.

      Reply
  16. Avatar of Rita M. RomeroRita M. Romero

    Hi Diane,

    Great question! I am taking this MOOC on my own time. With a new semester having finished its second week, down a staff person, interviewing, hiring, and training new student assistants, I have far too much work to do day to day to be able to participate on the MOOC at work. I wish I could though! I will definitely be sharing what I am learning with my colleagues. I am considering presenting my MOOC experience at one of the libraries professional development “brown bag lunch” events with another colleague or two that are taking MOOCs from other institutions, upon the completion of this MOOC. :D

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Rita!
      Yikes, I can see where it might be nearly impossible to fit this in at work for you! You know what I like about MOOCs though? Whatever work, readings, videos, blogs etc, we’ve done at home the night before, we carry with us to work the next day, as an extra, added benefit to our colleagues and users.
      I love that you’re thinking of presenting on your MOOC experience. We have something similar to “brown bag lunches”, that we call Tech Tuesdays. I think that maybe by committing to a presentation, we can get management to see MOOCs as a more credible form of professional development.
      Thanks for your comment!

      Reply
  17. Krista

    Hi Diane;
    I’m doing this MOOC on my own time – when I can find it. That said, our CEO totally supports me doing this. :) I’m in a smaller public library system (serving a community of about 46,000 people out of three branches) and there just isn’t a whole lot of time that I could devote to something like this at work. Definitely neat to see all the responses to this thread!
    :) Krista

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Krista!
      Thanks for taking the time to comment! I’m finding that even if I have time to work on the MOOC during the day, the only part that I can really concentrate on are the blog posts. The videos and reading require a quieter environment for me. I don’t have my own office, so there is a constant hum of activity around me, and I prefer to watch the videos in their entirety, rather than a minute here and there. I think it’s fantastic that your CEO supports your efforts, and that in the event you do find a few minutes of free time on a given day, won’t mind you watching a video, or reading an article at your desk.

      Diane

      Reply
  18. Avatar of Andrea MullarkeyAndrea Mullarkey

    I’m another one doing this entirely on my own time. We have a fairly supportive system for professional development and I doubt the fact that this is a MOOC would determine whether I could get institutional support for it or not. But as it is I struggle with getting my work done in the 40 hours our library strictly holds me to so I am definitely not going to crowd that time with something that I could do off hours. And so here I am on a lovely Sunday afternoon, sunshine in the backyard, beer in hand MOOCing away. Frankly, I think I will enjoy it more and get more out of it doing it “for myself” and not “for my library” anyway.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Andrea!
      I loved the image you painted for us of MOOCing on a Sunday afternoon! That sounded so lovely and relaxing! :-) I think there’s something to be said for doing things for yourself first, and feel this can only come back as a positive for your library in the long run. After all, don’t they always say to put the oxygen mask on first if you’re helping others? I actually went to library school for myself, and I enjoyed every minute of it… well, almost lol. But I think that focusing on my personal goals, as opposed to a specific professional goal helped me to explore. I wasn’t focused on a special track. I took the classes that interested me, which is why I was so bummed when I didn’t have enough semesters left take Michael’s class. But we’re here now. Yay! Here’s to MOOCing on beautiful Sunday afternoons!!
      Diane

      Reply
  19. Avatar of LindyLindy

    @hmlamond – I’m interested in reading your research as well! I signed up for this MOOC for personal & professional development and all my work on for the class is on my own time. I am really excited at a chance for a (free!) educational opportunity with two exceptional teachers and 400 other librarian colleagues from around the world.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Lindy!
      Thanks for dropping in! I feel extremely lucky to be a part of The Hyperlinked Library MOOC’s maiden voyage as well. The excitement felt by everyone has been palpable. I think we’re all kind of amazed at the amount of information, quality instruction, and networking we’re all being awarded free of charge. I feel a true sense of community here, much more so than I feel when attending conferences. There’s definitely something special about this one!
      Diane

      Reply
  20. Avatar of Rebecca SnowRebecca Snow

    I’m doing this on my own time. While my emails for the MOOC are received through my work email, I am the only person who works in my library so all my hours there are booked! September is a pretty heavy class visit/book talk month so maybe in October I’ll have time to squeeze in at least some of the reading or reflections at work.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Rebecca!
      Thanks for your comment! I certainly admire those of you taking this course while working on the library front lines. It’s a bit easier for me to balance, because I work in technical services, and am behind the scenes so to speak. One of my colleagues calls it the “underground secret lair where all the magic happens”. Lol I have a little freedom in between database renewals, invoices, and purchases to peek in from time to time, but I’m doing most of it at home as well. I hope October will give you a little break!
      Diane

      Reply
  21. Avatar of Linda SelvidgeLinda Selvidge

    I am completing this MOOC on my own time. However, I am using my lunch at work to do this, so I remain in the same frame of mind for 8 1/2 continuous hours. I have already learned so much during the 1st module, and have expanded my “to be read” list. I am looking forward to the next 11 weeks.

    Much of what I learn here will translate immediately into my current position. However, I am strategizing to return to my old school district when they open their first high school, so I am preparing my interview presentation at the same time. I currently work with adults in an academic setting (graduate students) but I wish to return to working with young adults.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Linda! Wow! What a well thought out plan you have. I love that you’re going to use the skills learned from this MOOC to craft an interview presentation. I think that this experience will be a notable one for all of us, and it can only serve to enhance our resumes. I also really like your idea of staying in the same mindset while working on the MOOC. I try to do the same, and have already noticed a stronger sense of confidence at doing my job. I walk around thinking about the MOOC all day, and every task I accomplish gives me more satisfaction than it did before. That may sound weird, but it’s true :-) Best of luck to you in your professional endeavors; the young adults in your area should be prepared to be impressed!
      Diane

      Reply
  22. Avatar of CJCJ

    Hi Diane, I am doing the Mooc in my own time, and for my own professional development and lifelong learning. However I am hoping to keep my colleagues informed with regular email updates and depending on how I get on with blogging (which is new to me) linking to my blog posts, or setting up a personal blog. Due to budget cuts we are not as active in the area of cpd as we used to be, while we would still be encouraged to attend conferences and seminars in our own particular area (in my case Journal/Serials) funding may not always be provided.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi CJ!
      I really like your idea about keeping colleagues updated about your MOOC experience. It’s a great way to share what you’re learning. I’m not certain I’d be able to keep up with email updates right now, but I may plan to do a recap once I’ve finished the MOOC. I’m going through the MOOC with a colleague, and we may team up to put together a presentation, or write up something with our thoughts about the experience.

      There are so many conferences I’m interested in attending, ALA, NASIG, Internet Librarian, to name a few, but the price tag for it all has me reeling. I’ve been fortunate in the past to have won awards and grants to attend, but I think that I may be at the tail end of that. I’ll just have to pick and choose carefully. I really want to attend ALA in Vegas! :-)
      Thanks for leaving a comment!
      Diane

      Reply
  23. Avatar of Cathy RettbergCathy Rettberg

    I am mostly doing this on my own time, but only because it is easier to put aside a chunk of time at home. At work (in a grades 6-12 school) there are just too many interruptions. I do tend to read postings and post comments in the early moments of the day, before the students are awake enough to ask for research help! And I’m the boss of my own library, which helps.

    I have demonstrated this course to a number of the faculty and to the ed tech folks at my school. People are really intrigued, ask how it is working, compare their experiences in other MOOCs. Doing this has opened up a whole new PD discussion at my school. My admin has agreed to let this be my PD project for the year instead of participating in one of the more school-organized experiences, which tend to be participation on some kind of research committee.

    I’m also using this MOOC as a kind of jumping-off point as I pursue the idea of creating my own online course. A group of us at my school will be taking three consecutive courses at Global Online Academy that will help us learn how to design an online course – not a MOOC, but an online experience that will enable students to work independently. In my case, I hope to put together a media literacy class that our students can take as an independent study. Another vision of library outreach.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Cathy!
      Thanks for sharing your thoughts here. I commend you for trying to fit some of this in at work. With grades 6-12, you must be so, so busy! It’s nice to hear that your colleagues are intrigued with your experiences in this MOOC. I think it’s really great that it’s touching off talks in new directions. I’m slightly envious, because I’m hitting some roadblocks at work, having to prove how this is related to my job etc. I’m thinking, “Are you kidding me? How is this NOT related?” lol
      I’m really impressed with your idea to create an online course! One of my last classes in library school was an instructional design for online learning class. It’s a very detailed process, but very doable. My instructor was Diane Kovacs. Here’s a link with some information about her. http://www.kovacs.com/dianevitae.html She’s a really cool person. Good luck with your online course, Cathy!

      Reply
  24. Avatar of Brian KellyBrian Kelly

    As I was made redundant on 31 July, I am doing this MOOC in my own time! I regard the MOOC as a means of gaining intellectual stimulation, learning new ideas and developing my professional network, which, I hope, will be valuable in finding new professional opportunities.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Brian,
      So sorry to hear about your job! I think this MOOC is the best possible place you could be under the circumstances. The content is rich, and I’ve been knocked out by the way this community has really pulled together for this experience. You now have over 400 people pulling for you! It’s nice to know you can throw out a question, and have people genuinely concerned enough to reply back. Best of luck to you in your job search! Keep us posted, and thanks so much for leaving a comment!
      Diane

      Reply
  25. Avatar of JoAnneJoAnne

    Just started a second part-time job so I will be doing the MOOC on my own time between my two jobs and the baseball pennant chase :D I’m doing this because I’m very interested in the topics and for professional development, of course!

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi JoAnne!
      Wow, full plate you have there! Now that we’re into the third module, I’m getting a better sense of the time commitment involved, and how to best fit the coursework into my schedule. I’m finding that aside from the occasional blog post or comment, I’m more comfortable working on this at home. I find the relaxed atmosphere allows for my best chance of absorbing the content. Best of luck with the pennant! Thanks for leaving a comment :-)

      Reply
  26. Avatar of Julie KahanJulie Kahan

    A little bit of both. Whatever project time I can find, I was given approval to work on this. To my knowledge, I am the only one in my system that is taking this MOOC and I hope to be able to share what I learn with those that are interested. Although lately, project time has dwindled but I certainly don’t mind putting in my own time as well as I am confident I will enjoy and take away valuable information from my participation in this course.

    Interesting thread Diane! Thank you. It is interesting to see the breakdown and I do feel lucky to be given permission to pursue professional development opportunities such as this one on work time. I may not be given “x” amount of time but any time I can find at work, it certainly helps.

    Reply
    1. Avatar of Diane MalmstromDiane Malmstrom Post author

      Hi Julie!
      Thanks for your comments! I’m really glad you enjoyed reading the thread. I’m happy that so many of you chose to share your experiences here. I’m with you in that I completely don’t mind using my own time to work on the MOOC. I know this experience will be so beneficial to the many projects in my future. I decided in the end that I’d go through this on my own, and then relay my experience during a department meeting later on. It’s not that I don’t receive support at work, they completely supported me all through library school, but I’m sensing a little resistance this time around. It may just be me lol, or maybe they thought it would end when I graduated. :-) But here I am right back at it. I think once it’s said and done though, they’ll see that it was very relative to what I’m working on, even if they didn’t see it at the start.
      Diane

      Reply

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